Can Bankruptcy Help You If You Owe Money Because of a Car Accident?

Can You Use Bankruptcy to Discharge a Judgment against You Resulting from an Accident?

Car accidentThough most judgments and settlements in motor vehicle accident cases are paid and defended by insurance companies, it is possible to have personal liabilities that are not covered by insurance. For example, you may not have any insurance coverage, or not enough coverage. In some cases, the insurance company, rather than defending, may “offer the policy limits” to the defendant. If the damages are more than that amount you may end up on the receiving end of a collection action.

Most insurance will not cover suits arising from an assault or other intentional tort, such as a bar fight.

So the first line of defense is making sure you are insured. But if you are not covered, a bankruptcy discharge may provide you the relief you need. But not all such debts are dischargeable.
Debts arising from death or personal injury caused by illegal operation of a motor vehicle boat or aircraft while drunk or under the influence of an illegal drug cannot be discharged in any bankruptcy. If there is insurance, the insurer will still have to pay, but anything the insurance does not pay will still be your liability after your bankruptcy discharge.

If convicted and required to pay restitution or fines as part of a sentence, that amount will be non-dischargeable in either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13. Note however that in New Jersey, motor vehicle insurance surcharges, but not criminal fines or penalties, can be discharged either in Chapter 7 or Chapter 13.

Debts arising from willful and malicious injury to a person or property may become non-dischargeable in a Chapter 7 case if the injured person files a lawsuit in the bankruptcy case seeking such a ruling. There is a limited time for such suits and if the deadline is missed, the debt is discharged. In a Chapter 13 case, no such requirement exists, and if death or personal injury was caused, the debt is not discharged. However, debts for willful and malicious injury to property (eg. vandalism) can be discharged.

A special caution is in order here. To qualify for Chapter 13, the total unsecured debt in a fixed and determinable amount cannot exceed a dollar limit, currently $383,175.00. Once a jury verdict, settlement or judgment is entered specifying the liability, that liability gets added to this total. Thus it may be critical to file a Chapter 13 case while the injury or criminal case is still pending and before any of this happens.
As always, it is best to avoid these types of situations, but if these issues exist,

Contact Neuner & Ventura, LLP

At Neuner & Ventura, LLP, we provide a free initial consultation to every client. To set up a meeting, call Neuner & Ventura at (856) 596-2828 or send us an e-mail. We do, however, reserve the right to charge a fee to review any work done by another attorney. Evening and weekend appointments are available upon request.

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